Skip to Main Content

Library & Innovation Centre

Banner

Resource Key

When accessing content use the numbers below to guide you:

 LEVEL 1: ‚Äč
brief, basic information laid out in an easy-to-read format. May use informal language. (Includes most news articles)

LEVEL 2: 
provides additional background information and further reading. Introduces some subject-specific language.

LEVEL 3:
lengthy, detailed information. Frequently uses technical/subject-specific language. (Includes most analytical articles)

Introduction

In the last twenty years, the history of women in ancient Christianity has been almost completely revised. As women historians entered the field in record numbers, they brought with them new questions, developed new methods, and sought for evidence of women's presence in neglected texts and exciting new findings. For example, only a few names of women were widely known: Mary, the mother of Jesus; Mary Magdalene, his disciple and the first witness to the resurrection; Mary and Martha, the sisters who offered him hospitality in Bethany. Now we are learning more of the many women who contributed to the formation of Christianity in its earliest years.

Perhaps most surprising, however, is that the stories of women we thought we knew well are changing in dramatic ways. Chief among these is Mary Magdalene, a woman infamous in Western Christianity as an adulteress and repentant whore. Discoveries of new texts from the dry sands of Egypt, along with sharpened critical insight, have now proven that this portrait of Mary is entirely inaccurate. She was indeed an influential figure, but as a prominent disciple and leader of one wing of the early Christian movement that promoted women's leadership.

For further reading: King, K. L. (1998, April). Women In Ancient Christianity: The New Discoveries. Retrieved October 10, 2016, from http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/religion/first/women.html

Links

Databases

Key terms